Several days ago, the Calbuco volcano erupted for the first time in nearly 50 years, and it did so with quite a vengeance. Over 4,000 people were forced to evacuate areas in southern Chile, and individuals from towns throughout the region reported heavy instances of ash-fall.

We asked our followers to send us some of their images. In a series of stunning photos, the columns of lava and ash are resolved with clarity from near and afar.

Image of the Calbuco eruption. Credit and copyright: Cristian Walker Mesina
Image of the Calbuco eruption. Credit and copyright: Cristian Walker Mesina
Image of the Calbuco eruption. Credit and copyright: Cristian Walker Mesina

The eruption spat out a plume of smoke that may extend beyond 65,000-feet (19,812-meter) high, with ash reaching as far as the Argentine town of San Martin de los Andes—about 105 miles from ground zero—and 140 miles (225 kilometers) north of Calbuco, in the towns of Villarica and Pucón. Residents in a number of areas reported instances of heavy ash falling after the eruption.

NASA’s Earth Observatory satellites captured images of the smoking volcano from space Thursday and Friday.

Image via NASA
Image via NASA
Image via Telemundo

The national park where the volcano is located is currently closed as a safety precaution (obviously).


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