Wired
Exoskeleton Dunk

Watch a Guy With Bad Knees Get Superpowers With a Powered Exoskeleton

byVictor Tangermann
Aug 26
Wired

The ultimate upgrade for anybody with bad knees.

Spring in His Step

In an incredible new Wired video, tech journalist Brent Rose had an incredible time testing out a powered exoskeleton built by the San Francisco-based company Roam Robotics.

As Rose explains in the clip, he’s had difficulties with his knees. But with the Roam’s Forge knee brace, he was able to carry the video’s producer in a fireman’s carry up several flights of stairs, while barely breaking a sweat — an extraordinary demonstration of how far the technology has come, nevermind where it might be headed.

 

Big Stomp

Rose was also able to jump from a high platform with 50 pounds of weight on his shoulders, something he explained would have landed him in months of physical therapy if it weren’t for the exoskeleton deftly softening the impact.

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The test was meant to simulate the impacts of being on a speed boat during high seas, an experience that can involve a ton of harsh G forces.

The device has its limits, however, particularly when it’s not used for its intended purpose. While technologically impressive, the Forge brace didn’t allow Rose to dunk a basketball, as he found out to his dismay.

“I was wrong to believe that I could fly and I feel stupid now,” a disappointed Rose said in the video.

More on exoskeletons: Engineer Builds Voice-Controlled Exoskeleton So His Son Could Walk 

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