Joe Biden Implores SXSW Crowd to Join His $6.3 Billion Initiative to Defeat Cancer

The former Vice President aims to double the pace of cancer research over the next 5 years.

March 13, 2017

Future Health: 2017’s Most Exciting Medical Advances

What does the next year have in store for the human body?

January 9, 2017

Researchers Uncover Critical New Clues About Cancer

This could help develop more personalized and accurate treatment.

January 9, 2017

Reprogramming Diseased Cells: Microsoft Announces Plans to “Solve Cancer” in 10 Years

From computer networks to cellular networks.

September 21, 2016

New Lasers Made of Blood Could Revolutionize Cancer Detection

Pew pew pew! A laser that uses human blood could be the best way to track tumors.

September 6, 2016

A “Self-Destruct” Switch for Cancer? New Method Turns Cancer Cells Against Themselves

UTSA biology professor Matthew Gdovin has successfully forced cancer cells in mice to wipe themselves out—essentially forcing them to "commit suicide." This is a noninvasive, less destructive procedure that will hopefully make cancer treatments easier and more successful.

July 7, 2016

Scientists Are Trying to Modify The Naked Mole-Rats’ Cancer Resistance For Humans

Naked mole-rats are the longest-living rodent species, and they exhibit 'extraordinary' resistance to cancer. Understanding these animals' anti-cancer mechanisms may help advance human treatment, according to a collaborative research team from Hokkaido University and Keio University in Japan.

June 21, 2016

New Method Can Detect Cancerous Mutations in Individual Cells

Monovar is a novel technique that uses only individual cancer cells in detection, and has possible applications beyond cancer detection.

April 25, 2016

Microscope Uses Artificial Intelligence to Find Cancer Cells

A new microscope employs AI deep learning to detect cancer cells better and more efficiently without using biological markers that harm blood samples.

April 17, 2016

Nipping Cancer in the Bud—New Supersensitive Biosensor Makes It Happen

This cancer detecting sensor is 1 million times more sensitive than previous versions.

April 1, 2016
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