• The team found that children with lifetime exposures to concentrations of air pollutants above the current U.S. standards, including fine particulate matter, are at an increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
  • The study found that clinically healthy children who live in a polluted environment and who also carry a gene – the apolipoprotein ε4 allele, already known to increase a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease – demonstrated compromised cognitive responses when compared with children carrying a gene with apolipoprotein ε3 allele.
  • In the U.S. alone, 200 million people live in areas where pollutants such as ozone and fine particulate matter exceed the standards.

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