• Their new discovery is unique in two ways. Unlike other hydrogen fuel production methods that rely on highly processed sugars, the Virginia Tech team used dirty biomass—the husks and stalks of corn plants—to create their fuel.
  • One of the biggest hurdles to widespread hydrogen use is the capital cost required to produce the fuel from natural gas in large facilities. Rollin’s model increased reaction rates by threefold, decreasing the required facility size to about the size of a gas station, which reduces associated capital costs.
  • The modest reaction conditions also indicate the feasibility of low-capital requirements for building distributed hydrogen generating and fueling stations based on this technology.

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