(Image Credit: ISRO)

Over the years, Mars — the fourth planet from the Sun  and potentially the most habitable — has been the subject to more probing by various space agencies than pretty much all other places in our solar system combined. As such. we have many stunning images of Mars from up-close and from far away. This image, however — put together using several different shots taken by ISRO’s “Mars Color Camera” (designed by the Ahmedabad-based Space Application Center)  — is unlike any we’ve ever seen before; a 3D image taken from an altitude of nearly 74,500 km.

The Mars Color Camera is situated aboard the Mars Orbiter Mission, which famously made history when it was inserted into orbit around the Red Planet on September 24th, 2014 after nearly a year (exactly 298 days, specifically) of traversing over 100 million miles of interplanetary space.

As a great “then vs now” example, the first ever “true color” image below was taken by the ESA’s Rosetta probe on February 24, 2007. It shows how Mars looks through green, yellow and blue filters (all captured with Rosetta’s Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System, or “OSIRIS”) — from 240,000 kilometers away.

(Image Credit: MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/ IAA/ RSSD/ INTA/ UPM/ DASP/ IDA)

The image resolution comes in at about 5 km; good enough to make out the regional dust storms that define the Red Planet.

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